Forward Reverse Switch Very Difficult To Move

Discussion in 'EZGO Electric' started by shortchase, Jun 10, 2018.

  1. shortchase

    shortchase New Member

    1998 TXT EZGO, electric golf cart, J498, Serial # 1119119. Moving that handle from FWD to REV or REV to FWD is a chore on the forward and reverse switch and is very difficult to move! I checked the linkage between the handle and that switch and it's clear; lubricated it also. Difficult to believe that the switch should be so tight. Any help really appreciated. THANKS.
     
  2. HotRodCarts

    HotRodCarts Cartaholic

    You can loosen the nut a little that holds the shaft in the forward and reverse switch and it should get easier to move. The switch should be pretty tight though.
     
  3. shortchase

    shortchase New Member

    Okay, I'll give that a try tomorrow. I understand that the switch should be fairly difficult to move, to prevent accidental gear-changing but this switch nearly requires a lever! I was thinking the contacts in the forward / reverse switch were corroded / burnt making the movement difficult. I really appreciate your help!
     
  4. HotRodCarts

    HotRodCarts Cartaholic

    When I read your original post I thought you lubed the shaft in the forward and reverse switch but after re-reading I see you lubed the linkage. You can take the forward and reverse switch apart and clean and lube the shaft. I usually use anti-seize.
     
  5. shortchase

    shortchase New Member

    1. Remove a cable - break the battery circuit. 2. Label the cables. 3. Take it apart for inspection -lube. (Replacing the F / R switch is on you tube) Reverse order for assembly? I didn't know the switch could be lubed. Probably best that I open the switch and see what is going on in there. There might be a couple of deformed contacts from over-heating that are requiring so much force to rotate the switch. It IS a 98 model. Things wear out. I actually have anti-seize compound. Again, thanks for your help.
     
  6. HotRodCarts

    HotRodCarts Cartaholic

    No problem you're welcome. Let us know how it works after to take the switch apart and clean and put anti-seize on the shaft.
     
  7. Glen Batchelor

    Glen Batchelor Active Member

    If you're lubricating a moving electrical contact it's best to use silicone di-electric grease. I have a huge bag of 5g pillows if you want a couple. Just PM your address and I'll toss a couple in the mail.
     
  8. shortchase

    shortchase New Member

    I think I have some. If not I'll let you know. In the Air Force we called it DC-4. Also, waiting for call to go pick-up the 4 wheeler, so maintenance on the cart is waiting. THANKS!
     
  9. HotRodCarts

    HotRodCarts Cartaholic

    Anti-seize on the shaft is fine there's no electronic connection there. Just put a light coat on it and make sure it doesn't get on the contacts when you slide it back together. The dielectric grease Glen mentioned will work also.
     
  10. shortchase

    shortchase New Member

    Okay, THANKS, gents. Still on standby to pick-up the 4 wheeler. They didn't call today so kart maintenance is put off 'til another day. At least I have lots of information about how to accomplish the task.
     
  11. shortchase

    shortchase New Member

    Took 2 + hours to remove the switch. Attaching bolts were frozen with rust; had to grind one off. Taking today off. Switch appears undamaged.
     
  12. HotRodCarts

    HotRodCarts Cartaholic

    Take the switch apart, clean and grease the shaft, When you put it back together tighten the nut on the shaft until it bottoms out. If it's still to hard to shift back the nut off a little. Remember there has to be good tension on the contacts or the switch and cables will fry from heat.
     
  13. Glen Batchelor

    Glen Batchelor Active Member

    Yes, loose connections on the motor circuit can damage components quickly. I melted the top corner of a battery due to a loose ground cable on the pack. The 4ga wire was so hot I couldn't touch it for 20 minutes. DC-4 is a Dow Corning compound number that used to be spec'd in aerospace (maybe still is). I use ChemPlex 710 on everything electrical and on low-stress surfaces to prevent corrosion. A good moly or copper anti-seize compound is better for areas that will have a large amount of friction and pressure.
     
  14. shortchase

    shortchase New Member

    Switch removed and inspected. Saw no burned or melt areas. The switch contained no obvious signs of rust or corrosion. It moved freely but with lots of resistance. So, "...if it ain't broke; don't fix it..." Put it back into the cart and it operates as intended just with, what I consider, too much resistance. Thanks for everyone's help.
     
  15. HotRodCarts

    HotRodCarts Cartaholic

    Thanks for the follow up. :hattip:
     

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